Without water coolers, dispatch halls, or factory floors, how can workers interact? Continue reading...
What are your ideas on new ways to organize, mobilize, and provide voice and influence to those doing today's jobs? The CASBS project on "The Future of Work and Workers" could use your thoughts, which might then appear (credited) in future articles and reports in Pacific Standard. Perhaps we'd even solicit an essay.

Consider how old industrial jobs brought people together on the factory floor and in residential communities. Many new industries tend to separate rather than congregate workers, and contemporary employees lack class or other common social identities. Increased individuation makes it harder to mobilize or find a collective voice. Unions are under attack, but, even so, they have yet to find strategies that suit the changing employment picture. This is the argument in my August 3 piece in Pacific Standard. What are your thoughts?