There is so much social media outrage about gun violence. But is anyone listening? Continue reading...
After the latest shooting, take a quick glance at Twitter. First you will find outrage, sadness, defensiveness and attempts to use the tragedy to advance political agendas. Then you will see, at least among those who are fed up with gun violence, an overwhelming sense of powerlessness. This tweet from the Washington Post's @daveweigel sums it up: "Thank god we have Twitter to spread maybe-fake news updates and crowdsource impotent rage is all I’m saying." Here are just a few other tweets that express the same sentiment: @paultrinh: "Arguing semantics and gun rights vs control is fruitless on social media. All I will say is the senseless violence breaks my heart." @3fixedhearts: "It's not enough to post or Tweet a prayer. We have to do more than hashtags. Gun control takes real work, not just well-shared social media." @bradkaboosky: "Another shooting, another social media debate about gun control, stereotypes, and what Obama is doing about it." @ryanmer: "It's sobering to recognize that no matter what I post to social media, about gun control, nothing will ever, ever change." Anyway, you get the idea.

Social media can be a powerful tool for sparking real-life action. #blacklivesmatter activists, for example, have used social media to influence the national conversation. So why hasn't social media been a more effective tool for reducing gun violence?

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